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Manual: f77(1)

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Please contact or Mt Xia for assistance with all your shell programming needs.


f77(1)								       f77(1)



Name
  f77 -	invokes	the Digital Fortran 77 (formerly DEC Fortran) compiler

Syntax
  f77 [	options	] filename [ options ]

Description
  The f77 command invokes the Digital Fortran 77 (FORTRAN-77) compiler.	It
  produces object code files in	ULTRIX RISC or Digital UNIX Alpha extended
  coff format.

  The f77 command interprets arguments (filenames) as follows:

  ++    Arguments with the suffix .f, .for, or .FOR are interpreted as
       FORTRAN-77 source programs.  These programs are compiled, and the name
       of the resulting	object program is the basename of the source file
       with a .o substituted for the .f, .for, or .FOR.	 (For example, in
       source file myfile.f, myfile is the basename; so	the object program is
       named myfile.o.)	If the source program is compiled and loaded, the .o
       file is deleted.

  ++    Arguments with the suffix .F are	interpreted as FORTRAN source pro-
       grams, which must be processed by the C preprocessor ( cpp(1)) before
       being compiled.

  ++    Arguments with the suffix .r or .e are interpreted as ratfor or efl
       source programs,	respectively.  These programs are first	transformed
       by the appropriate preprocessor and then	compiled.

  ++    Arguments with the suffix .i are	interpreted as FORTRAN-77 source pro-
       grams that have been preprocessed by cpp(1).  They are compiled
       without further preprocessing.

  When a source	program	requires preprocessing by cpp(1), efl(1), ratfor(1),
  or m4(1), the	name of	the output file	generated by the preprocessor con-
  sists	of the basename	of the source input file with the appropriate prepro-
  cessor suffix.  For example:

	m4     myfile.r	 =>  myfile.p
	efl    myfile.e	 =>  myfile.f
	ratfor myfile.r	 =>  myfile.f
	cpp    myfile.F	 =>  myfile.i


  Note that if you have	myfile.F and myfile.i as distinct files, cpp(1)
  overwrites myfile.i to produce an output file	with the same name.

  If the environment variable DECFORT is set, the value	is used	as the name
  of the compiler to invoke.  If the environment variable DECFORT_FPP is set,
  the value is used as the name	of the preprocessor for	FORTRAN	files.	If
  the environment variable TMPDIR is set, the value is used as the directory
  for temporary	files.

  If the environment variable DECFORT_INIT is defined, its value has to	have
  the form

     [[pre] [::	[post]]

  where	the items in "[...]" are optional and can be empty, and	where "pre"
  and "post" are strings to be added to	the command line.  "pre" is added to
  the front of the command line, before	any characters the user	typed;
  "post" is added to the end of	the command line.

  The f77 command passes the following command line options to cpp(1):
  -Dname=def, -Dname, -I, -Idir, -M, -Uname, and -Wp,....  Depending on	which
  platform you are using, the f77 command defines the following	cpp(1) macros
  to cpp(1):

  ++    All platforms: LANGUAGE_FORTRAN,	__LANGUAGE_FORTRAN__, unix, __unix__

  ++    RISC only: host_mips, __host_mips__

  ++    Alpha only: __alpha

  ++    Digital UNIX only: __osf__

  ++    ULTRIX RISC only: MIPSEL, mips, __mips__

  For example, if you are using	a Digital UNIX Alpha system, the following
  cpp(1) macros	are defined to cpp(1): LANGUAGE_FORTRAN,
  __LANGUAGE_FORTRAN__,	unix, __unix__,	__alpha, and __osf__.

  The following	examples demonstrate optimizing	across multiple	input files:

    1.	f77 -o foo ax.f	bx.f cx.f

	This command causes the	files ax.f, bx.f, and cx.f to be
	compiled as one	program, with the resulting executable
	file foo.

    2.	f77 -c -O4 ax.f	bx.f cx.f

	This command causes the	files ax.o, bx.o and cx.o to
	be created.  Inter-procedural optimization is hindered
	because	these input files are separately compiled.

    3.	f77 -c -o foo.o	-O4 ax.f bx.f cx.f

	This command causes the	files ax.f, bx.f and cx.f to be
	compiled as one	program, with the resulting object file
	foo.o.	This produces better optimization.


  f77 sends its	output to stderr. Upon completion, the f77 driver returns one
  of the following status values:

     0	-  SUCCESS
     1	-  FAILURE
     2	-  SUBPROCESS_FAILURE (preprocessor, decfort, or ld)
     3	-  SIGNAL


  You can override some	options	specified on the command line by using the
  OPTIONS statement in your FORTRAN source program.  An	OPTIONS	statement
  affects only the program unit	where the statement occurs.  For more infor-
  ma

  For more information on this version of the Digital Fortran 77 compiler,
  see the release notes	in /usr/lib/cmplrs/fort/relnotes.

Options
  Some f77 options are specified using keywords. Specify these options in the
  form:	-name keyword. You must	spell out the -name completely,	but you	can
  abbreviate the keyword to its	shortest unique	prefix (4 characters is	the
  recommended length). For example, you	can specify -assume
  noaccuracy_sensitive as -assume noac,	and -check underflow as	-check unde.

  The f77 command takes	the following options:

  -1	       Executes	at least one iteration of DO loops.  (FORTRAN-77 DO
	       loops are not executed if the upper limit is smaller than the
	       lower limit.) This option has the same effect as	-nof77.

  -66	       Allows extensions that enhance FORTRAN-66 compatibility (same
	       as the -nof77 option).

  -align commons
	       Aligns all COMMON block entities	on natural boundaries, up to
	       4-bytes.	 The default is	-align nocommons.

  -align dcommons
	       Aligns all COMMON block entities	on natural boundaries, up to
	       8-bytes.	 The default is	-align nocommons.  For optimal per-
	       formance	on Alpha systems, specify -align records (the
	       default)	and -align dcommons.

  -align norecords
	       Aligns all RECORD fields	on the next available byte boundary,
	       instead of natural boundaries.  The default is -align records,
	       unless you specify -vms (which sets the -align norecords
	       option).

  -ana	       Produces	a file containing analysis information (about the
	       source code being compiled) for use with	the Source Code
	       Analyzer	(SCA).	The name of the	file is	the basename of	the
	       source file with	a .ana substituted for the .f, .for, or	.FOR.
	       The default is not to produce an	analysis file.	This option
	       is only available on ULTRIX systems.

  -assume backslash
	       Treats the backslash (\)	character literally in character
	       literals.  The default is -assume nobackslash, which treats
	       the backslash character as C-style control (escape) character
	       syntax.

  -assume byterecl
	       Specifies (for unformatted data files) that the units for the
	       OPEN statement RECL specifier (record length) value are in
	       bytes, not longwords (four-byte units). For formatted files,
	       the RECL	unit is	always in bytes.

	       INQUIRE returns RECL in bytes if	the unit is not	open.
	       INQUIRE returns RECL in longwords if the	file is	open for
	       unformatted data	(and -assume byterecl is not specified); oth-
	       erwise, it returns RECL in bytes.

  -assume dummy_aliases
	       Assumes that dummy (formal) arguments to	procedures share
	       memory locations	with other dummy arguments or with COMMON
	       variables that are assigned.  These program semantics slow
	       performance and do not strictly obey the	FORTRAN-77 Standard.
	       The default is -assume nodummy_aliases.

  -assume
	       accuracy_sensitive.

  -vms	is used).  The default is -assume
	       source_include, which tells the compiler	to search the direc-
	       tory the	source file is in for any INCLUDEs.

  -assume nounderscore
	       Does not	append a trailing underscore character to external
	       user-defined names: the main program name, named	COMMON,	BLOCK
	       DATA, and names implicitly or explicitly	declared EXTERNAL;
	       the name	of blank COMMON	remains	_BLNK__. FORTRAN intrinsic
	       names are not affected.	The default is -assume underscore.

  -automatic   Places local variables on the run-time stack. The default is
	       -noautomatic.

  -bestGnum    Requests	examination of source module data items	during compi-
	       lation and linking to calculate the best	number of bytes	to be
	       used for	the -G num option.  Summary information	is written to
	       stdout, including a recommended value for -G num.  This option
	       is only available on ULTRIX RISC	systems.

  -C	       Generates code to perform run-time checks on subscript and
	       substring expressions (same as the -check bounds	option). An
	       error is	reported if the	expression is outside the dimension
	       of the array or the length of the string. The default
	       suppresses range	checking.

  -c	       Suppresses the loading phase of the compilation and forces an
	       object file to be produced even if only one program is com-
	       piled.  If you specify multiple files and want full interpro-
	       cedural optimizations, you must also specify the	-o option.
	       (This creates a single .o file.)

  -call_shared Produces	a dynamic executable that uses shareable objects dur-
	       ing run-time.  The linker searches for unresolved references
	       in shared library (.so) files before searching in archive
	       library (.a) files. The run-time	loader is invoked to bring in
	       all required shareable objects and resolve any symbols that
	       remained	undefined during static	link-time. This	is the
	       default.	 This option is	only available on Digital UNIX sys-
	       tems.

  -check bounds
	       Generates code to perform run-time checks on subscript and
	       substring expressions. An error is reported if the expression
	       is outside the dimension	of the array or	the length of the
	       string.	The default is -check nobounds.

  -check noformat
	       Suppresses the FORVARMIS	fatal error.  This error occurs	at
	       run time	when the data type of an item being formatted for
	       output does not match the format	descriptor being used (for
	       example,	a REAL*4 item formatted	with an	I edit descriptor).
	       If -vms is specified, the default is -check format; otherwise,
	       the default is -check noformat.

	       With -check noformat, the data item is formatted	using the
	       specified descriptor unless the length of the item cannot
	       accomodate the descriptor (for example, it is still an error
	       to pass an INTEGER*2 item to an E edit descriptor).

  -check nooutput_conversion
	       Suppresses the OUTCONERR	continuable error message.  This
	       error occurs at run time	when a data item is too	large to fit
	       in a designated FORMAT descriptor field.	 The field is filled
	       with asterisks (*) and execution	continues.  If -vms is speci-
	       fied, the default is -check output_conversion, which displays
	       the OUTCONERR message; otherwise, the default is	-check
	       nooutput_conversion.

  -check nopower
	       Suppresses the run-time errors for 0.0**0.0 and
	       **, so 0.0**0.0 is
	       1.0 and (-3.0)**3.0 is -27.0.  The default is -check power,
	       which causes fatal run-time errors for these cases.

  -check overflow
	       Generates code to trap on integer overflow.  The	default	is
	       -check nooverflow.

  -check underflow
	       Produces	a message at run time to warn that floating-point
	       underflow has occurred.	Floating-point underflow replaces the
	       result with 0, unless you specify the -fpe3 or -fpe4 option.
	       The default is -check nounderflow.

  -check_bounds
	       Generates code to perform run-time checks on subscript and
	       substring expressions (same as the -check bounds	option).   An
	       error is	reported if the	expression is outside the dimension
	       of the array or the length of the string.  The default
	       suppresses range	checking.

  -col72       Treats the statement field of each source line as ending	in
	       column 72 (same as the -noextend_source option).

  -convert big_endian
	       Specifies that unformatted data will be in big endian integer
	       format of the appropriate size: INTEGER*1, INTEGER*2, or
	       INTEGER*4; and IEEE floating point format of the	appropriate
	       size: REAL*4, REAL*8, COMPLEX*8,	or COMPLEX*16.	Note that
	       INTEGER*1 data is the same for little endian and	big endian.

	       The default is -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -convert cray
	       Specifies that unformatted data will be in big endian integer
	       format of the appropriate size: INTEGER*1, INTEGER*2, or
	       INTEGER*4; and CRAY (TM)	floating-point format of size REAL*8
	       or COMPLEX*16.

	       The default is -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -convert fdx Specifies that unformatted data will be in little endian
	       integer format of the appropriate size: INTEGER*1, INTEGER*2,
	       or INTEGER*4; Digital VAX floating-point	format F_floating for
	       size REAL*4 or COMPLEX*8, D_floating for	size REAL*8 or COM-
	       PLEX*16,	and X_floating for REAL*16.

	       The default is -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -convert fgx Specifies that unformatted data will be in little endian
	       integer format of the appropriate size: INTEGER*1, INTEGER*2,
	       or INTEGER*4; Digital VAX floating-point	format F_floating for
	       size REAL*4 or COMPLEX*8, floating-point	format G_floating of
	       size REAL*8 or COMPLEX*16, and X_floating for REAL*16.

	       The default is -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -convert ibm Specifies that unformatted data will be in big endian integer
	       format of the appropriate size: INTEGER*1, INTEGER*2, or
	       INTEGER*4; and IBM (TM) System\370 floating-point format	of
	       size REAL*4 or COMPLEX*8	(IBM short 4) and size REAL*8 or COM-
	       PLEX*16 (IBM long 8).

	       The default is -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -convert native
	       Specifies that unformatted data should not be converted.	 This
	       is the default.

  -convert vaxd
	       Specifies that unformatted data will be in little endian
	       integer format of the appropriate size: INTEGER*1, INTEGER*2,
	       or INTEGER*4; and Digital VAX floating-point format F_floating
	       for size	REAL*4 or COMPLEX*8, D_floating	for size REAL*8	or
	       COMPLEX*16, and H_floating for REAL*16.

	       The default is -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -convert vaxg
	       Specifies that unformatted data will be in little endian
	       integer format of the appropriate size: INTEGER*1, INTEGER*2,
	       or INTEGER*4; and Digital VAX floating-point format F_floating
	       for size	REAL*4 or COMPLEX*8, floating-point format G_floating
	       of size REAL*8 or COMPLEX*16, and H_floating for	REAL*16.

	       The default is -convert native.	For more information, see
	       your DEC	Fortran	user manual.

  -cord	       Runs the	cord(1)	procedure-rearranger on	the resulting file
	       after linking.  This rearrangement reduces the cache conflicts
	       of the program's	text.  The output of cord(1) is	left in	the
	       file specified by the -o	output option (or a.out, by default).
	       At least	one -feedback file must	be specified.

  -cpp	       Runs cpp(1) on all FORTRAN source files before compiling.
	       This includes FORTRAN source files created by ratfor(1) or
	       efl(1).

  -cross_reference
	       Includes	in the listing (if one is generated with -V ), a
	       cross-reference of all symbols used in the source program,
	       along with line numbers of definitions and uses (same as	the
	       -show xref option).  The	default	is -nocross_reference.

  -Dname       Defines the name	for cpp(1), as if by #define.  If no defini-
	       tion is given, the name is defined as "1".

  -diag	       Produces	a file containing compiler messages and	diagnostic
	       information for use with	the Language Sensitive Editor (LSE).
	       The name	of the file is the basename of the source file with a
	       .dia substituted	for the	.f, .for, or .FOR. The default is not
	       to produce a diagnostic file.  This option is only available
	       on ULTRIX systems.

  -d_lines     Compiles	lines having a D in column 1 of	the source program.
	       The default is to treat such lines as comments.

  -double_size 64
	       Defines DOUBLE PRECISION	declarations, constants, functions,
	       and intrinsics as REAL*8; it has	no effect on DOUBLE COMPLEX
	       data. This option is only available on Digital UNIX systems.
	       This is the default.

  -double_size 128
	       Defines DOUBLE PRECISION	declarations, constants, functions,
	       and intrinsics as REAL*16; it has no effect on DOUBLE COMPLEX
	       data.  This option is only available on Digital UNIX systems.
	       The default is -double_size 64.

  -E	       Uses any	remaining characters in	the argument as	efl(1)
	       options when processing an .e file.  The	temporary file,	used
	       as the output of	efl(1),	consists of the	last component of the
	       source file with	a .f substituted for the .e.  This temporary
	       file is removed unless you specify the -K option.

  -error_limit nn
	       Specifies the maximum number of error-level or fatal-level
	       compiler	errors allowed for a file specified on the f77 com-
	       mand line.  If you specify -noerror_limit, there	is no limit
	       on the number of	errors that are	allowed.  The default is
	       -error_limit 30 (or a maximum of	30 error-level and fatal-
	       level messages).

	       If -c is	specified on the command line and the maximum number
	       of errors is reached, a warning message is issued and the next
	       file (if	any) on	the command line is compiled.  If -c is	not
	       specified, a warning message is issued and compilation ter-
	       minates.

  -extend_source
	       Treats the statement field of each source line as ending	in
	       column 132, instead of column 72.  The default is
	       -noextend_source.

  -F	       Applies the efl(1) and ratfor(1)	preprocessors to relevant
	       files and puts the result in files whose	names have their suf-
	       fix changed to .f.  (No .o files	are created.)

  -f66	       Allows extensions that enhance FORTRAN-66 compatibility (same
	       as the -nof77 option).

  -f77	       Enforces	FORTRAN-77 semantics instead of	FORTRAN-66 semantics.
	       This is the default.

  -fast	       Sets the	following command options that can improve run-time
	       performance: -assume noaccuracy_sensitive, -align dcommons,
	       -math_library fast, and -O4 (the	default).

  -feedback file
	       Specifies the file to be	used by	cord(1)	or the compiler	for
	       further optimizations.  This file is produced by	prof(1)	with
	       its -feedback option from an execution of the program produced
	       by pixie(1).

  -fpe0	or -fpe
	       Terminates a program during run time if a floating-point
	       operation results in overflow, a	division by zero, or invalid
	       data; before termination, the compiler issues a message,	and
	       creates a core dump file. In the	case of	floating-point under-
	       flow, the program does not terminate, but continues with	the
	       underflow value set to zero. (The compiler issues a warning
	       message if -check underflow is set).  This is the default.

  -fpe1	       Continues program execution if a	floating-point operation
	       results in overflow, a division by zero,	invalid	data, or
	       floating-point underflow	(the underflow value is	set to zero,
	       and the compiler	issues a warning message if -check underflow
	       is set).

  -fpe2	       Continues program execution if a	floating-point operation
	       results in overflow, a division by zero,	invalid	data, or
	       floating-point underflow, and prints a warning message in the
	       first two instances. In the case	of floating-point underflow,
	       the underflow value is set to zero.  Upon program completion,
	       the compiler provides a count of	how many times each exception
	       occurred.

  -fpe3	       Continues program execution if a	floating-point operation
	       results in overflow, a division by zero,	invalid	data, or
	       floating-point underflow	(the compiler issues a warning mes-
	       sage if -check underflow	is set).  For underflow, the under-
	       flow value is not set to	zero, and gradual underflow occurs.

  -fpe4	       Continues program execution if a	floating-point operation
	       results in overflow, a division by zero,	invalid	data, or
	       floating-point underflow, and prints a warning message in the
	       first two instances. Upon program completion, the compiler
	       provides	a count	of how many times each exception occurred.
	       For underflow, the underflow value is not set to	zero, and
	       gradual underflow occurs.

  -fpp	       Runs fpp(1) on all FORTRAN files	before compiling; it has no
	       effect on compilation of	C programs. fpp(1) handles a subset
	       of the functionality of cpp(1).	This option is only available
	       on Digital UNIX systems.

  -fprm	chopped
	       Causes the compiler to round results of calculations toward
	       zero.

  -fprm	dynamic
	       Allows run-time selection of a rounding mode by calling the
	       Digital UNIX write_rnd(3) routine.  The read_rnd(3) routine
	       can be used to find the current rounding	mode (which is stored
	       in the floating-point control register (fpcr)).

	       If you specify -fprm dynamic without calling the	write_rnd(3)
	       routine,	the default setting ( -fprm nearest ) is used.

  -fprm	minus_infinity
	       Causes the compiler to round results of calculations toward
	       the next	smallest representative	value.

  -fprm	nearest
	       Causes the compiler to round results of calculations toward
	       the nearest representable value.	This is	the default.

  -G num       Specifies the maximum size ( num	), in bytes, of	a COMMON
	       block to	be accessed from the global pointer.  The argument
	       num is assumed to be a decimal number.  If num is zero, no
	       data is accessed	from the global	pointer.  The default value
	       for num is 8 bytes.  This option	is only	available on ULTRIX
	       RISC systems.  (Also see	the -bestGnum option.)

  -g0	       Prevents	symbolic debugging information from appearing in the
	       object file.

  -g1	       Produces	traceback information (showing pc to line correla-
	       tion) in	the object file, substantially increasing its size.
	       This is the default.

  -g2 or -g    Produces	traceback and symbolic debugging information in	the
	       object file.  This option sets the -O0 option.  However,	if
	       you specify an explicit -O option, the specified	option is
	       effective.

  -g3	       Produces	traceback and symbolic debugging information in	the
	       object file, and	performs whatever optimizations	you specify.
	       This option can produce additional debugging information
	       describing the effects of optimizations,	but debugging inaccu-
	       racies can occur	as a result of the optimizations that have
	       been performed.

  -gen_feedback
	       Directs the compiler to generate	code that will produce accu-
	       rate feedback information when profiled.	 The steps are:

		 1. f77	-gen_feedback -o x x.f

		 2. pixie x

		 3. x.pixie

		 4. prof x -pixie -feedback x.fb x.Addrs x.Counts

		 5. f77	-feedback x.fb -O5 -fast -o x x.f


  -granularity byte
	       Ensures that data of byte size can be accessed from different
	       threads sharing data in memory.

  -granularity longword
	       Ensures that naturally aligned data of longword size (4 bytes)
	       can be accessed from different threads sharing data in memory.
	       When this option	is in effect, attempts to access smaller size
	       data or misaligned data can result in data items	that are
	       inconsistently updated for multiple threads.

  -granularity quadword
	       Ensures that naturally aligned data of quadword size (8 bytes)
	       can be accessed from different threads sharing data in memory.
	       This is the default.  When this option is in effect, attempts
	       to access smaller size data or misaligned data can result in
	       data items that are inconsistently updated for multiple
	       threads.

  -I	       Prevents	cpp(1) from searching for #include files in the	stan-
	       dard directory /usr/include.  It	also prevents the compiler
	       from searching there for	files specified	in an INCLUDE state-
	       ment.

  -Idir	       Directs the search for cpp(1) #include files and	files speci-
	       fied in a Digital Fortran INCLUDE statement.  The file names
	       must not	begin with slash (/). Directories are searched in the
	       following order:	(1) the	directory preceding the	input file
	       name on the command line; (2) the directories specified by the
	       -Idir option; (3) the standard directory	 /usr/include.	(See
	       also the	-noinclude option.)

  -i2	       Makes default integer and logical variables 2-bytes long	(same
	   
	       32.  For	optimal	performance on Alpha systems, use 4- or	8-
	       byte integer or logical values instead of 2-byte	values.

  -i4	       Makes default integer and logical variables 4-bytes long	(same
	       as the -integer_size 32 option).	 This is the default.

  -i8	       Makes default integer and logical variables 8-bytes long	(same
	       as the -integer_size 64 option).	 This option is	only avail-
	       able on Alpha systems.  The default is -integer_size 32.

  -ident       Specifies that what(1) style identification strings should be
	       placed in the .o	object file.  The formats of the strings are:

		 (c)compiler-identification
		 (m)module-name
		 (d)date

	       These strings are always	created	for Fortran main programs,
	       and when	the CDEC$ IDENT	statement in source creates a what(1)
	       module identification string.  The default is -noident.

  -inline all  Inlines every call that it is possible to inline	while still
	       generating correct code.	 However, recursive routines will not
	       cause an	infinite loop at compile time.

  -inline manual
	       Inlines only statement functions. This is the default for
	       optimization levels -O2 and -O3.

  -inline none Suppresses all inlining of routines.  This is the default for
	       optimization levels -O0 and -O1.

  -inline size Inlines all of the routines in the -inline manual category,
	       plus any	additional calls that the compiler determines will
	       improve run-time	performance without significantly increasing
	       the size	of the program.	 This option was previously called
	       -inline automatic (and -inline space ).

  -inline speed
	       Inlines all of the routines in the -inline manual category,
	       plus any	additional calls that the compiler determines will
	       improve run-time	performance, even where	it may signficantly
	       increase	the size of the	program.  This is the default for
	       optimization levels -O, -O4, and	-O5.

  -integer_size	16
	       Makes default integer and logical variables 2-bytes long.  The
	       default is -integer_size	32.  For optimal performance on	Alpha
	       systems,	use 4- or 8-byte integer or logical values instead of
	       2-byte values.

  -integer_size	32
	       Makes default integer and logical variables 4-bytes long.
	       This is the default.

  -integer_size	64
	       Makes default integer and logical variables 8-bytes long.
	       This option is only available on	Alpha systems.	The default
	       is -integer_size	32.

  -K	       Does not	remove temporary files created during compilation and
	       linking.	 This option does not affect the naming	of temporary
	       files.  To see the names	and locations of the temporary files,
	       specify -v.

  -L	       Prevents	the linker from	searching for libraries	in the stan-
	       dard directories.

  -Ldir	       Directs the linker to search for	libraries in dir before
	       searching the standard directories.

  -lstring     Searches	-libstring libraries for ld (see ld(1) ).  This
	       option should be	placed at the end of the command line.

  -M	       Tells cpp(1) to generate	dependency lists suitable for
	       make(1),	instead	of the normal output.

  -m	       Applies the m4(1) preprocessor to each efl or ratfor source
	       file before transforming	it with	the ratfor(1) or efl(1)
	       preprocessors.  The temporary file used as the output of	m4(1)
	       consists	of the last component of the source file with a	.p
	       substituted for the .e or .r.  This temporary file is removed
	       unless you specify the -K option.

  -machine_code
	       Includes	in the listing (if one is generated with -V ), a
	       machine language	representation of the compiled code.  This
	       machine language	cannot be assembled.  The default is
	       -nomachine_code.

  -math_library	accurate
	       Specifies that the compiler is to select	the version of the
	       math library routine which provides the most accurate result
	       for mathematical	intrinsic functions.  This is the default.

	       For certain ranges of input values, the selected	routine	may
	       execute more slowly than	if you used -math_library fast.

  -math_library	fast
	       Specifies that the compiler is to select	the version of the
	       math library routine which provides the highest execution per-
	       formance	for certain mathematical intrinsic functions, such as
	       EXP and SQRT.

	       For certain ranges of input values, the selected	routine	may
	   
	       accurate	(the default setting) provides.

  -names as_is Causes the compiler to distinguish between uppercase and
	       lowercase letters in identifiers	and external names.  The
	       default is -names lowercase.

  -names lowercase
	       Causes the compiler to treat uppercase and lowercase letters
	       as equivalent in	identifiers and	to force all external names
	       to be lowercase.	 This is the default.

  -names uppercase
	       Causes the compiler to treat uppercase and lowercase letters
	       as equivalent in	identifiers and	to force all external names
	       to be uppercase.	 The default is	-names lowercase.

  -noautomatic Causes all local	variables to be	statically allocated.  This
	       is the default.

  -nocpp       Does not	run cpp(1) on any FORTRAN source files before compil-
	       ing.  This includes FORTRAN source files	created	by ratfor(1)
	       or efl(1).

  -noerror_limit
	       Specifies that there is no limit	to the number of error-level
	       or fatal-level compiler errors allowed for a file specified on
	       the command line.

  -noextend_source
	       Treats the statement field of each source line as ending	in
	       column 72 of the	source program.	 This is the default.

  -nof77       Allows extensions that enhance FORTRAN-66 compatibility.

  -nofpp       Does not	run fpp(1) (or cpp(1) )	on FORTRAN source files
	       before compiling.

  -nofor_main  Specifies that the main program is not written in FORTRAN, and
	       prevents	the compiler from linking for_main.o into applica-
	       tions. This option is only available on Digital UNIX systems.
	       The default is -for_main.

  -noi4	       Makes default integer and logical variables 2-bytes long	(same
	       as the -integer_size 16 option).	 For optimal performance on
	       Alpha systems, use 4- or	8-byte integer or logical values
	       instead of 2-byte values.

  -noident     Specifies that what(1) style identification strings should not
	       be placed in the	.o object file,	unless the source contains
	       the CDEC$ IDENT statement or a main program.

  -noinclude   Directs the compiler not	to search in /usr/include for files
	       specified in a Digital Fortran INCLUDE statement.  You can
	       specify the -Idir option	along with this	option.	 This option
	       has no effect on	searches for cpp(1) #include files.

  -noinline    Suppresses all inlining of routines (same as the	-inline	none
	       option).

  -non_shared  Does not	produce	a dynamic executable.  The linker will search
	       regular archive library (.a) files to resolve undefined refer-
	       ences; .so files	 are not searched.   Object files (.o suffix)
	       from archives are included in the executable produced. This
	       option is only available	on Digital UNIX	systems.  The default
	       is -call_shared.

  -nopipeline  Disables	the use	of instruction scheduling to certain inner-
	       most loops. Also	disables prefetching of	data to	reduce the
	       impact of cache misses.

	       This option must	be specified if	you want this type of optimi-
	       zation disabled and you are also	specifying -O5,	since -pipe-
	       line is performed by default at the -O5 level of	optimization.

  -norecursive Compiles	all FUNCTION and SUBROUTINE procedures for non-
	       recursive execution. This is the	default.

  -noreentrancy
	       Tells the Digital Fortran RTL that the program will not	be
	       relying on threaded or asynchronous (AST) reentrancy.  This
	       option is the same as the -reentrancy none option.

  -norun       Directs the driver not to execute the compiler and other
	       phases of the process.  If you use this option with the -v
	       option, you can see what	would have been	executed.

  -nospeculate Disables	all speculative	code scheduling.  This option is only
	       available on systems running Digital UNIX Version 4.0 or
	       higher.	This is	the same as the	-speculate none	option.

  -notransform_loops
	       Disables	a group	of loop	transformation optimizations that
	       apply to	array references within	loops.	This group of optimi-
	       zations includes	loop blocking, loop distribution, loop
	       fusion, loop interchange, loop scalar replacement, and outer
	       loop unrolling.

	       This option must	be specified if	you want this type of optimi-
	       zation disabled and you are also	specifying -O5,	since
	       -transform_loops	is performed by	default	at the -O5 level of
	       optimization.

  -nowarn      Suppresses all warning messages.	This option has	the same
	       effect as -warn nogeneral.

  -O0	       Disables	all optimizations. Does	not check for unassigned
	       variables.

  -O1	       Enables local optimizations and recognition of common subex-
	       pressions.  The call graph determines the order of compilation
	       of procedures.

  -O2	       Enables global optimization and all -O1 optimizations.  This
	       includes	code motion, strength reduction	and test replacement,
	       split lifetime analysis,	code scheduling, and inlining of
	       arithmetic statement functions.

  -O3	       Enables additional global optimizations that improve speed (at
	       the cost	of extra code size), for example: integer multiplica-
	       tion and	division expansion (using shifts), loop	unrolling,
	       and code	replication to eliminate branches.  Also performs all
	       -O2 optimizations.

  -O4 or -O    Enables inline expansion	of small procedures and	all -O3
	       optimizations.  This is the default.  However, if you specify
	       the -g option, the default is -O0.  (See	also the -g2 or	-g
	       option.)

  -O5	       Enables software	pipelining, loop transformation	optimiza-
	       tions, and other	optimizations, including byte-vectorization,
	       and insertion of	additional NOPs	(No Operations)	for alignment
	       of multi-issue sequences.

	       Loop transformation optimizations are a group of	optimizations
	       that apply to array references within loops. These optimiza-
	       tions can improve the performance of the	memory system and can
	       apply to	multiple nested	loops. This type of optimization can
	       also be specified by using the -transform_loops option.

	       Software	pipelining  applies instruction	scheduling to certain
	       innermost loops,	allowing  instructions within a	loop to	"wrap
	       around" and execute in a	different iteration of the loop.
	       This can	reduce the impact of long-latency operations, result-
	       ing in faster loop execution. This type of optimization can
	       also be specified by using the -pipeline	option.

	       To determine whether using -O5 benefits your particular
	       program,	you should time	program	execution for the same pro-
	       gram compiled with -O4.

  -o output    Names the final output file output. The a.out file is unaf-
	       fected.

  -om	       Performs	code optimization after	linking, including NOP (No
	       Operation) removal, .lita removal, and reallocation of common
	       symbols.	This option also positions the global pointer regis-
	       ter so the maximum addresses fall in the	gp-accessible window.
	       The -om option is supported only	for programs compiled with
	       the -non_shared option.

	       The following options can be passed directly to -om by using
	       the -WL compiler	option:

	       ++   -WL,-om_compress_lita

		   Removes unused .lita	entries	after optimization, and	then
		   compresses the .lita	section.

	   

		   Removes dead	code (unreachable instructions)	generated
		   after applying optimizations. The .lita section is not
		   compressed by this option.

	       ++   -WL,-om_no_inst_sched

		   Turns off instruction scheduling.

	       ++   -WL,-om_no_align_labels

		   Turns off alignment of labels. Normally, the	-om option
		   quadword aligns the targets of all branches to improve
		   loop	performance.

	   

		   Sets	the size threshold of common symbols. Every common
		   symbol whose	size is	less than or equal to "num" will be
		   allocated close to each other. This option can be used to
		   improve the probability that	the symbol can be accessed
		   directory from the global pointer register. Normally, the
		   -om option tries to collect all common symbols together.

  -onetrip     Executes	at least one iteration of DO loops.  (FORTRAN-77 DO
	       loops are not executed if the upper limit is smaller than the
	       lower limit.) This option has the same effect as	-nof77.

  -P	       Runs only cpp(1)	and puts the result for	each source file, by
	       suffix convention (for example, .f, .r, .e, and .s), in a
	       corresponding .i	file, after being processed by the appropri-
	       ate preprocessors.  The .i file does not	have line numbers (#)
	       in it.  This option sets	the -cpp option.

  -p0	       Does not	permit profiling. If loading occurs, the standard
	       run-time	startup	routine	(crt0.o) is used, and the profiling
	       libraries are not searched.  This is the	default.

  -p1 or -p    Sets up profiling by periodically sampling the value of the
	       program counter.	 This option only effects the loading.	When
	       loading occurs, this option replaces the	standard run-time
	       startup routine with the	profiling runtime startup routine
	       (mcrt0.o) and searches the level	1 profiling library
	       (libprof1.a).

	       When profiling occurs, the startup routine calls	monstartup(3)
	       and produces the	file mon.out, which contains execution-
	       profiling data for use with the postprocessor prof(l).  If you
	       specify -p1 or -p, you should also specify -g1 or higher.

  -pad_source  Specifies that source records shorter than the statement	field
	       width are to padded with	spaces on the right, out to the	end
	       of the statement	field.	This affects the interpretation	of
	       character and Hollerith literals	that are continued across
	       source records.

	       The default is -nopad_source, which causes a warning to be
	       displayed if a character	or Hollerith literal that ends before
	       the statement field ends	is continued onto the next source
	       record.

  -pg	       Sets up profiling for gprof(1), which produces a	call graph
	       showing the execution of	the program. With this option, the
	       standard	run-time startup routine is replaced by	the gcrt0.o
	       routine,	and ld(1) inserts calls	to _mcount at each entry
	       label.

	       Programs	that are linked	with the -pg option and	then run,
	       produce the files gmon.out and gmon.sum.	 File gmon.out con-
	       tains a dynamic call graph and profile; file gmon.sum contains
	       a summarized dynamic call graph and profile. To display the
	       output, run gprof on the	gmon.out file.

  -pipeline    Applies instruction scheduling to certain innermost loops,
	       allowing	instructions within a loop to "wrap around" and	exe-
	       cute in a different iteration of	the loop.  This	can reduce
	       the impact of long-latency operations, resulting	in faster
	       loop execution. -pipeline also enables prefetching of data to
	       reduce the impact of cache misses.

	       This type of optimization can be	specified for optimization
	       levels -O2 and higher; it is performed by default if -O5	is in
	       effect.

  -R	       Uses any	remaining characters in	the argument as	ratfor
	       options whenever	processing a .r	file.  The temporary file,
	       used as the output of ratfor(1),	consists of the	last com-
	       ponent of the source file with a	.f substituted for the .r.
	       This temporary file is removed unless you specify the -K
	       option.

  -r8	       Defines REAL declarations, constants, functions,	and intrin-
	       sics as DOUBLE PRECISION	(REAL*8), and defines COMPLEX
	       declarations, constants,	functions, and intrinsics as DOUBLE
	       COMPLEX (COMPLEX*16).  This option is the same as the
	       -real_size 64 option.

  -r16	       Defines REAL declarations, constants, functions,	and intrin-
	       sics as REAL*16.	 It does not affect COMPLEX objects.  This
	       option is the same as the -real_size 128	option.

  -real_size 32
	       Defines REAL declarations, constants, functions,	and intrin-
	       sics as REAL*4, and defines COMPLEX declarations, constants,
	       functions, and intrinsics as COMPLEX (COMPLEX*8).  This is the
	       default.

  -real_size 64
	       Defines REAL declarations, constants, functions,	and intrin-
	       sics as DOUBLE PRECISION	(REAL*8), and defines COMPLEX
	       declarations, constants,	functions, and intrinsics as DOUBLE
	       COMPLEX (COMPLEX*16).  The default is -real_size	32.

  -real_size 128
	       Defines REAL declarations, constants, functions,	and intrin-
	       sics as REAL*16.	 It does not affect COMPLEX objects.

  -recursive   Compiles	all FUNCTION and SUBROUTINE procedures for possible
	       recursive execution. This sets the -automatic option.  The
	       default is -norecursive.

  -reentrancy asynch
	       Tells the Digital Fortran RTL that the program may contain
	       asynchronous (AST) handlers that	could call the RTL. This
	       causes the RTL to guard against AST interrupts inside its own
	       critical	regions.

  -reentrancy none
	       Tells the Digital Fortran RTL that the program will not be
	       relying on threaded or asynchronous (AST) reentrancy.  So, the
	       RTL will	not guard against such interrupts inside the RTL.
	       This is the default and is the same as the -noreentrancy
	       option.

  -reentrancy threaded
	       Tells the Digital Fortran RTL that the program is mul-
	       tithreaded, such	as programs using the DECthreads library.
	       This causes the RTL to use thread locking to guard its own
	       critical	regions.

  -S	       Creates an assembleable listing file of the compiled source.
	       The name	of this	listing	file is	the base name of the source
	       file with a .s substituted for the .f, .for, or .FOR.  No link
	       step occurs.

	       You cannot generate a -S	listing	and a -V listing in the	same
	       compilation.

  -shared      Produces	a dynamic shareable object for inclusion in a shared
	       library.	The linker will	produce	a shareable object that	other
	       dynamic executables can use at run-time.	 If you	also specify
	       the -c option, a	.o file	is created; otherwise, a .so file is
	       created.	This option is only available on Digital UNIX sys-
	       tems.  The default is -call_shared.

  -show	code   Includes	in the listing (if one is generated with -V ), a
	       machine language	representation of the compiled code (same as
	       the -machine_code option).  This	machine	language cannot	be
	       assembled.  The default is -show	nocode.

  -show	include
	       Includes	in the listing (if one is generated with -V ), any
	       text file specified with	INCLUDE	in the source program. The
	       default is -show	noinclude.

  -show	nomap  Excludes	from the listing (if one is generated with -V ),
	       information about the symbols used in the source	program.  The
	       default is -show	map.

  -show	xref   Includes	in the listing (if one is generated with -V ), a
	       cross-reference of all symbols used in the source program,
	       along with line numbers of definitions and uses (same as	the
	       -cross_reference	option).  The default is -show noxref.

  -speculate all
	       Enables speculative code	scheduling for all routines in the
	       program.	This option is only available on systems running
	       Digital UNIX Version 4.0	or higher.

	       Speculation occurs when a conditionally executed	instruction
	       is moved	to a position before a test instruction	so that	the
	       moved instruction is then executed unconditionally.  This
	       reduces instruction latency stalls, but performance may be
	       reduced because the run-time system must	dismiss	exceptions
	       caused by speculative instructions.  Speculation	affects	code
	       most noticeably at -O3 and higher.

	       Any exception (for example: SIGSEGV, SIGBUS, or SIGFPE),	any-
	       where in	the entire program, is assumed to be speculative.
	       All of these exceptions are quietly dismissed without calling
	       any user-mode signal handler.  If a module is compiled using
	       -speculate all, it cannot be linked with	any other module or
	       library that does its own exception processing.

	       Since speculation turns off some	run-time error checking, this
	       option should not be used while debugging or while testing for
	       errors.

  -speculate by_routine
	       Indicates that all routines in the current module can do
	       speculation, but	this speculation will not affect routines in
	       other modules in	the program.  This option is only available
	       on systems running Digital UNIX Version 4.0 or higher.

  -speculate none
	       Disables	all speculative	code scheduling.  This option is only
	       available on systems running Digital UNIX Version 4.0 or
	       higher.	This is	the same as the	-nospeculate option.

  -stand mia   Controls	whether	the compiler suppresses	diagnostic messages
	       for extensions to the ANSI FORTRAN-77 standard that are
	       included	in the NTT Technical Requirement TR550001, Multiven-
	       dor Integration Architecture (MIA) Version 1.1, Division	2,
	       Part 3-2, Programming Language FORTRAN. This option enables
	       syntax checking ( -stand	syntax ) to be performed.  The
	       default is -stand nomia.

  -stand semantic
	       Causes the compiler to issue informational messages for state-
	       ments that conform to the ANSI Standard but become nonstandard
	       because of how they are used.  This option sets the -stand
	       syntax option.  The default is -stand nosemantic.

  -stand nosource_form.

  -stand syntax
	       Causes the compiler to issue informational messages for syntax
	       extensions to the ANSI Standard.	 The default is	-stand nosyn-
	       tax.

  -static      Causes all local	variables to be	statically allocated (same as
	       the -noautomatic	option).  This is the default.

  -std	       Produces	warnings for things that are not standard in the
	       language	(same as the -stand semantic -stand syntax options).

  -synchronous_exceptions
	       Causes the compiler to generate TRAPB instructions after	every
	       floating-point instruction.  This is a very expensive but
	       effective way to	synchronize the	instruction stream containing
	       floating-point exceptions so the	failing	instruction can	be
	       accurately located by the debugger or a handler.	 The default
	       is -nosynchronous_exceptions.  This option is only available
	       on Digital UNIX systems.

  -syntax_only Controls	whether	the source file	is checked only	for correct
	       syntax. No code is generated, no	object file is produced, and
	       some error checking done	by the optimizer is bypassed (for
	       example,	checking for uninitialized variables). This option
	       allows you to do	a quick	syntax check of	your source file.
	       The default is -nosyntax_only.

  -transform_loops
	       include:

		 Loop blocking
		 Loop distribution
		 Loop fusion
		 Loop interchange
		 Loop scalar replacement
		 Outer loop unrolling

	       This type of optimization can be	specified for optimization
	       levels -O2 and higher; it is performed by default if -O5	is in
	       effect.

	       To determine whether using -transform_loops benefits your par-
	       ticular program,	you should time	program	execution for the
	       same program (or	subprogram) compiled at	-O4.

  -tune	       Selects processor-specific instruction tuning for implementa-
	       tions of	the Alpha architecture.	 The format is:

		 -tune generic | host |	ev4 | ev5


	       Regardless of the setting of the	-tune option, the generated
	       code will run correctly on all implementations of the Alpha
	       architecture.  Tuning for a specific implementation can
	       improve run-time	performance;  it is also possible that code
	       tuned for a specific target may run slower on another target.
	       The following are -tune options:

	       ++   generic

		   Selects instruction tuning that is appropriate for all
		   implementations of the Alpha	architecture.	This is	the
		   default.

	       ++   host

		   Selects instruction tuning that is appropriate for the
		   machine the compilation is occurring	on.

	       ++   ev4

		   Selects instruction tuning for the 21064, 20164A, 21066,
		   and 21068 implementations of	the Alpha architecture.

	       ++   ev5

		   Selects instruction tuning for the 21164 implementation of
		   the Alpha architecture.

  -U	       Causes the compiler to distinguish between uppercase and
	       lowercase letters in identifiers	and external names.  This
	       option is the same as the -names	as_is option.

  -Uname       Tells cpp(1) to remove any initial definition of	name.

  -u	       Makes the default type of a variable undefined (IMPLICIT
	       NONE), which causes the compiler	to issue a warning for any
	       undeclared symbols (same	as the -warn declarations option).
	       This behavior differs from default FORTRAN rules.

  -unroll n    Controls	loop unrolling done by the optimizer (at levels	-O3
	   
	       are to be unrolled; it must be an integer in the	range 0
	       through 16. -nounroll is	not allowed.  The default is -unroll
	       0 (where	the optimizer uses its default unroll amount).

  -V	       Creates a listing file of the source file with various
	       compile-time information	appended. The name of the listing
	       file is the basename of the source file with a .l substituted
	       for the .f, .for, or .FOR.

	       How you compile source files determines how the listing file
	       is created. If you compile several source files together, one
	       listing file is created (named with the basename	of the first
	       input file and the .l suffix).  If you compile source files
	       one at a	time, a	separate listing file is created for each
	       input file (named with the basename of the input	file and the
	       .l suffix).

  -v	       Prints the passes as they execute with their arguments and
	       their input and output files; also prints final resource	usage
	       in the C-shell time format.

  -vms	       Causes the run-time system to behave like Digital Fortran on
	       OpenVMS VAX systems (VAX	FORTRAN) in the	following ways:

	       ++   Reinforces certain defaults

		   Reinforces the following Digital Fortran 77 defaults:
		   -fpe0, -static, -names lowercase (so	A is equivalent	to
		   a), and -norecursive.  You can override this	by specifying
		   the option on the command line.  For	example, if you
		   specify -vms	-fpe2, you get -fpe2.  The -vms	option also
		   forces -check format	and -check output_conversion.

	       ++   Alignment

		   -vms	does not affect	the alignment of fields	in records or
		   items in COMMON.  Use -align	norecords to pack fields of
		   records on the next byte boundary for compatibility with
		   Digital Fortran on OpenVMS VAX systems.

	       ++   INCLUDE qualifiers

		   Recognizes /LIST and	/NOLIST	at the end of the file path-
		   name	in an INCLUDE statement	at compile time.

		   If the file name in the INCLUDE statement does not specify
		   the complete	path, the path used is the current directory.

	       ++   Quotation mark character (")

		   Recognizes a	quotation mark as starting an octal constant
		   (such as "177) instead of a character literal ("...").

	       ++   Control character syntax

		   Does	not recognize the \n control character syntax in
		   character literals (same as the -assume backslash option).

	       ++   Deleted records in relative files

		   When	a record in a relative file is deleted,	the first
		   byte	of that	record is set to a known character (currently
		   '@').  Attempts to read that	record later result in
		   ATTACCNON errors.  The rest of the record (the whole
		   record, if -vms is not set) is set to nulls for unformat-
		   ted files and spaces	for formatted files.

	       ++   ENDFILE records

		   When	an ENDFILE is performed	on a sequential	unit, an
		   actual one byte record containing a Ctrl/D is written to
		   the file.  If -vms is not set, an internal ENDFILE flag is
		   set and the file is truncated.

		   The -vms option does	not affect ENDFILE on relative files;
		   such	files are truncated.

	       ++   Reading deleted records and ENDFILE records

		   The run-time	direct access READ routine checks the first
		   byte	of the retrieved record. If this byte is '@' or	NULL
		   ("\0"), then	ATTACCNON is returned.

		   The run-time	sequential access READ routine checks to see
		   if the record it just read is one byte long and contains a
		   Ctrl/D. If this is true, it returns EOF.

	       ++   OPEN	effects

		   Carriage control defaults to	FORTRAN	if the file is for-
		   matted, and the unit	is connected to	a terminal (checked
		   by means of isatty(3) ). Otherwise, carriage	control
		   defaults to LIST.

		   The -vms option affects the record length for direct
		   access and relative organization files.  The	buffer size
		   is increased	by one (to accommodate the deleted record
		   character).

	       ++   Implied logical unit	numbers

		   Recognizes certain environment variables at run time	for
		   ACCEPT, PRINT, and TYPE statements, and for READ and	WRITE
		   statements that do not specify a unit number, such as:
		   READ	(*,1000).  For more information, see your DEC Fortran
		   user	manual.

	       ++   Treatment of	blanks in input

		   Causes the defaults for keyword BLANK= in OPEN statements
		   to become 'NULL' for	an explicit OPEN, and 'ZERO' for an
		   implicit OPEN of an external	or internal file.

  -Wp,arg1[,arg2...]
	       Passes switches arg1[,arg2...] to cpp(1)	that the driver	does
	       not normally pass to cpp(1); for	example: -Wp,-C,-M passes -C
	       -M to cpp(1).  -Wp,...  does not	invoke cpp(1); use -cpp	to
	       force the execution of cpp(1).

  -w	       Suppresses all warning messages (same as	the -nowarn option).

  -w1	       Suppresses warnings about unused	variables (same	as the -warn
	       nounused	option).

  -warn	argument_checking
	       Enables warnings	about argument mismatches between caller and
	       callee, when compiled together.	The default is -warn
	       noargument_checking.

  -warn	declarations
	       Makes the default type of a variable undefined (IMPLICIT
	       NONE), which causes the compiler	to issue a warning for any
	       undeclared symbols.  This behavior differs from default FOR-
	       TRAN rules.  The	default	is -warn nodeclarations.

  -warn	noalignments
	       Suppresses warning messages for data that is not	naturally
	       aligned.	 The default is	-warn alignments.

  -warn	nogeneral
	       Suppresses all warning messages (same as	the -nowarn option).
	       The default is -warn general.

  -warn	noinformational
	       Suppresses all informational messages. The default is -warn
	       informational, unless you also specify -warn nogeneral.	In
	       this case, no warning or	informational messages are displayed.

  -warn	nouncalled
	       Suppresses warning messages when	a statement function is	never
	       called. The default is -warn uncalled.

  -warn	nouninitialized
	       Suppresses warning messages for a variable that is used before
	       a value is assigned to it. The default is -warn uninitialized.

  -warn	nounreachable
	       Suppresses warning messages for a section of code that is
	       unreachable (no path to it). The	default	is -warn unreachable.

  -warn	nousage
	       Suppresses warning messages about questionable programming
	       practices which,	although allowed, often	are the	result of
	       programming errors.  For	example, a continued character or
	       Hollerith literal whose first part ends before the statement
	       field and appears to end	with trailing spaces.  The default is
	       -warn usage.

  -warn	truncated_source
	       Displays	a warning at compile time when there are source
	       characters to the right of column 80 (or	column 132 if
	       -extend_source is specified) in a non-comment line.  The
	       default is -warn	notruncated_source, which suppresses the
	       warning.

  -warn	unused Enables warning messages	about unused variables.	 The default
	       is -warn	nounused.

  -what	       Prints the version strings of the f77 driver and	the Digital
	       Fortran 77 compiler.  If	-what appears alone on the command
	       line, the compiler is not executed.

  f77 ignores the following options and	displays an informative	message	say-
  ing they are unsupported:

  -align8
  -align16
  -align32     Allows misalignment in COMMON.

  -col120      Truncates source	after column 120.

  -q	       Does not	display	file and program names.

  -w66	       Suppresses F66 compatibility warnings.

  f77 does not process the following options, but passes them to the cc(1)
  compiler:

  -D num       Tells ld(1) to set the data segment origin.  If num starts
	       with a hexadecimal letter, precede it with the digit "0".

  -fptm	x      Tells cc(1) how to support exception handling (on Digital UNIX
	       systems only).

  -ko output   Tells cc(1) the name for	the output file	created	by ucode
	       loader.

  -N...	       Tells cc(1) to enlarge static tables.

  -Olimit num  Tells cc(1) to NOOPT if a routine is too	big.

  -systype name
	       Names compilation environment (on ULTRIX	RISC systems only).

  -T num       Tells ld(1) to set the text segment origin.  If num starts
	       with a hexadecimal letter, precede it with the digit "0".

  -W...	       Passes command line options to other phases of the compilation
	       process.

  f77 stops compilation	if the following option	is specified:

  -EB	       Produces	big endian byte	order.

  The compiler assumes other arguments are either loader options or FORTRAN-
  77-compatible	object files, typically	produced by an earlier f77 run,	or by
  libraries of FORTRAN-77-compatible routines.	These files, together with
  the results of any compilations specified, are loaded	in the order given,
  producing an executable program with the default name	a.out.

Restrictions
  The standard library,	/usr/lib/libc.a, is loaded with	the -lc	loader option
  and not a full pathname. The wrong library can be loaded if there are	files
  with the name	libc.a in the directories specified with the -L	loader
  option, or in	the default directories	searched by the	loader.

Diagnostics
  The f77 command produces diagnostic messages that are	intended to be self-
  explanatory.	The loader can also produce occasional messages.



Files

  a.out					 Loaded	output

  file.f				 Input file

  file.o				 Object	file

  mon.out				 File produced for analysis by
					 prof(1)

  /tmp/for*				 Temporary

  /usr/bin/efl				 Extended FORTRAN language preproces-
					 sor

  /usr/bin/f77				 FORTRAN compilation driver

  /usr/bin/fpr				 Formats FORTRAN carriage-control
					 listings for printing

  /usr/bin/fsplit			 Utility to break FORTRAN modules
					 into individual routines

  /usr/bin/ld				 Link editor (ld)

  /usr/bin/ratfor			 Rational FORTRAN dialect preproces-
					 sor

  /usr/include				 Standard directory for	`#include'
					 files

  /usr/include/foriosdefs.f		 PARAMETER statements for the values
					 of IOSTAT

  /usr/include/for_fpe_flags.f		 PARAMETER statements defining the
					 flags for floating point exception
					 handling used by FOR_GET_FPE( ) and
					 FOR_SET_FPE( )

  /usr/lib/cmplrs/fort/decfort		 Digital Fortran 77 compiler

  /usr/lib/cord				 Procedure-rearranger

  /usr/lib/cpp				 C macro preprocessor

  /usr/lib/crt0.o			 Run-time startup

  /usr/lib/ftoc				 Interface between prof(1) and
					 cord(1)

  /usr/lib/libc.a			 Standard library, see intro(3)

  /usr/lib/libfor.a			 Digital Fortran I/O support

  /usr/lib/libi				 Internationalization library

  /usr/lib/libm.a			 Math library

  /usr/lib/libots.a			 Digital Fortran run-time string
					 support

  /usr/lib/libprof1.a			 Level 1 profiling library

  /usr/lib/libUfor.a			 Digital Fortran UNIX interface
					 library, see intro(3f)

  /usr/lib/mcrt0.o			 Startup for profiling



  The following	files are only available on ULTRIX systems:

  /usr/lib/libfor_G0.a			 Libfor	for use	with -G	0

  /usr/lib/libUfor_G0.a			 LibUfor for use with -G 0

  /usr/lib/libutil.a			 Digital Fortran miscellaneous run-
					 time support

  /usr/lib/libutil_G0.a			 Libutil for use with -G 0

  /usr/lib/nls/msg/ENG_GB.MCS/for_msg.cat
					 FORTRAN run-time message catalog



  The following	files are only available on Digital UNIX systems:

  /usr/lib/fpp				 FORTRAN macro preprocessor

  /usr/lib/libFutil.a			 Digital Fortran miscellaneous run-
					 time support

  /usr/lib/nls/msg/en_US.88591/for_msg.cat
					 FORTRAN run-time message catalog

  /usr/shlib/libc.so			 Standard library, see intro(3)

  /usr/shlib/libFutil.so		 Digital Fortran miscellaneous run-
					 time support

  /usr/shlib/libfor.so			 Digital Fortran I/O support

  /usr/shlib/libots.so			 Digital Fortran run-time string sup-
					 port

  /usr/shlib/libUfor.so			 Digital Fortran UNIX interface
					 library, see intro(3f)

See Also
  as(1), cc(1),	cord(1), cpp(1), dbx(1), decladebug(1),	efl(1),	fpr(1),
  fsplit(1), ftoc(1), gprof(1),	ld(1), lex(1), m4(1), pixie(1),	prof(1), rat-
  for(1), what(1), monstartup(3), read_rnd(3), write_rnd(3), intro(3f)
  DEC Fortran Language Reference Manual
  DEC Fortran user manual
  Digital Fortran 77 release notes in /usr/lib/cmplrs/fort/relnotes
  Digital Fortran 77 help file (text format) in
	/usr/lib/cmplrs/fort/decfortran.hlp

-
Manual: f77(1)
-
 

Introduction
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2a
Chapter 2b
Chapter 3
Chapter 4a
Chapter 4b
Chapter 5a
Chapter 5b
Chapter 6a
Chapter 6b
Chapter 6c
Chapter 7a
Chapter 7b
Chapter 8
Chapter 9a
Chapter 9b
Manual: ar(1)
Manual: cb(1)
Manual: cc(1)
Manual: expr(1)
Manual: f77(1)
Manual: ftp(1)
Manual: ksh(1)
Manual: lint(1)
Manual: sh(1)
Manual: test(1)
Manual: time(1)


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